BSD

SMT Cleanup - Deleting Unneeded Repos

# yast --> Network Services --> SMT Server Management

Review list of repos which have been mirrored, paying close attention to the target column which outlines the chipset. Make a list of the NAME and TARGET columns; this is important for later.

Ensure the repo is not set to currently mirror, or the deletion will fail (Alt-M)

Once you are out of yast, run, # smt-repos --delete

Copy the corresponding ID number (second column) which match the NAME and TARGET columns (beware, SLES11-SAP is different than SLE11-SAP).

Once you have the list, you can plug in the ID number one at a time to confirm the path contains both the NAME and the TARGET you wish to delete:

Delete repository `/src/www/htdocs/repo/SUSE/Backports/SLE-12-SP3_arch64/product/`?
(y/N)


NOTE: The command smt-repos --delete can only accept one (1) ID at a time.
BSD

VirtualBox 6.0


It was always a pain in the ass moving VMs under VirtualBox for a whole host of reasons. Thankfully, in v6.0 they've included a move function! Which of course doesn't work. Sure it might work if I weren't moving VMs from one volume to another (the only reason off the top of my head I can think to do so) and using the new move function that errors out with VERR_NOT_SAME_DEVICE, a singularly unique error which does not show up anywhere on Google, nor the VirtualBox forums.

Thankfully, doing it the old-fashioned way still seems to work: Using the Virtual Media Manager, detach the *.vdi, tar up the directory in which the VM resides, move it to a new volume, delete it from VBox, Add --> New and point to the old VM in the new location, then re-attach your *.vdi.
religion

Millennials


I sometimes wonder if the drop in church attendance attributed to millennials has less to do with the rise of the Information Age and more of a logical conclusion to the generation-long conflation of religion and morality. "What happens behind closed doors" was universal code for the polarity of public versus private attitudes hiding behind outwardly decent, God-fearing folk. Yet our children were there with us behind those closed doors; they heard our vitriol, watched our reprehensible behavior toward ourselves and others, and understood all too well the manifestation of the seven-deadly sins hiding behind our pasted on smiles and false shock over hearing of others doing exactly what we were guilty of or worse. Let us bear the responsibility for their rejection.
BSD

Building OpenStack; First Steps

i5 CPU (2.9GHz)/16GB RAM

/dev/sda2 52GB SSD partition mounted as /

Running openSUSE 15.1</blockquote>

/dev/sda2 300GB 7200rpm partition mounted as /~OpenStack

Contains VM ControllerNode1 2x4GB Running Centos 7

5GB storage (thin)

192.168.1.40 (enp0s3)

192.168.1.41 (enp0s8)

Contains VM ComputeNode1 4x6GB Running Centos 7

10GB storage (thin)

192.168.1.38 (enp0s3)

192.168.1.39 (enp0s8)

/dev/sdb3 152GB 7200rpm partition mounted as /VMs

Contains VM ObjectStorageNode1 1x2GB Running Centos 7

8GB storage (thin)

192.168.1.43 (enp0s3)

Contains VM ObjectStorageNode2 1x2GB Running Centos 7

8GB storage (thin)

192.168.1.44 (enp0s3)

/dev/sdc 30GB SSD-hybrid USB3.0 thumb mounted as /USB

Contains VM BlockStorageNode1 1x2GB Running Centos 7

4GB storage (thin)

192.168.1.42 (enp0s3)

Raspberry Pi 3 Model B
(1.2 GHz/1GB RAM)

/dev/root 32GB microSD partition mounted as /

Running Raspian Buster

OpenMediaVault NAS

/dev/cloud 256GB RAID0
You can't RAID USB devices, so...

pool0 (64GB) shared to BlockStrorageNode1 as /pool0

pool1 (64GB) shared to BlockStrorageNode1 as /pool1

pool2 (64GB) ObjectStorageNode1 as /pool2

pool3 (64GB) ObjectStrorageNode2 as /pool3

Referenced resources:
https://www.openmediavault.org
https://docs.openstack.org/install-guide/environment-packages-rdo.html#finalize-the-installation
https://docs.openstack.org/keystone/latest/install/keystone-install-rdo.html#keystone-install-configure-rdo
https://docs.openstack.org/horizon/latest/install/install-rdo.html