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Personal Workspaces - A History

Posted on 2007.11.14 at 09:12

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Tomas Gallucci
schpydurx at 2007-11-15 05:56 (UTC) (Link)
There's just too much to discuss in one comment alone. I'm thinking maybe a comment an age, but some things won't require that.



I'll start with general questions and cover at least the first epoch.



Q. What is your obsession with CRTs? Even though they've been main stream for over 7 years, you still do not sport one in your home use. I do see, however, that you have/had a modded case not unlike Black Widow



1982-1989

You started your "career" when you were 13. I think I've got a bit of a jump on you. I'd have to go back and do the math; I can't remember if I got my first machine when I was 12 or 13. Of course, when I bought my machine it was a Win98 box from Gateway. PII 300 Mhz, 32 MB of RAM, 5 GB drive on-board video and a DVD ROM. That box eventually got upgraded to 256 MB of memory (motherboard's Max) a CD R/RW a 40 & 30 GB drive with a PCI video card to boot!





What made you get into computers in the first place? I know that I got into them because of games, but much like with Nintendo (or any other console for that matter) I couldn't play and win so I quickly lost interest in gaming. Of course, it also helped that I didn't have the money and that it cost so much to build a gaming rig. I'm not sure what you did with that TI machine for seven years, but I'm sure each moment was cherished until it just wouldn't do what you wanted it to anymore.



1989-1991

You started off with an Apple. Now you own a Mac mini. How ironic!



You've stated at various times that you can't/don't program, but recently you mentioned hacking a Perl script and here you reveal that you used to write Apple Basic. What's the deal? Do you just not like programming, never got into it or what? I mean how do you start with code/script and end up a Sys Admin? (I'll answer that question in a bit.) See, I can't help but compare this to when you tried to compile the IRC server and took out all the "comments". As long as you've been around doing this, I'm surprised you're not at least marginally familiar with C.



You already look old in that picture and yet wise beyond your years. Hell, you don't look 20, you almost look 40. No, I'm not saying this because of our recent banters; I'm merely observing that you look old for your age--like you've already had a lifetime of experience.



Buying a monitor from Dillard's? That's not geekdom, that's...well, I suppose you were a product of your generation. After all, shopping malls were in their heighth during the late 80's.



91-92

In two years you lost 10 but the experience/maturity still comes through. Have you always been a forward thinking person?



Why did you write so many letters? Did you ever aspire to be a writer? Is there a story that you want to tell about how you were/are torn between your passion for computers and your desire to be an accomplished writer?



How did you get to party with lesbians? I bet they got all naked and shit. Hell, I have a hard time partying with myself these days. Youth is wasted on the wrong people.



97

I'm guessing that there was a lot of history skipped; an epoch missed. I see that after the apple it appears that you went through a couple of PCs. When exactly did the Unix training occur?



98

You look like some evil Mexican bastard that rapes kids at night and does B movies by day. Where did all the weight come from?



99

Visually boring. This is the first mention of Unix in this post.



2000

Very cluttered. I'm glad you made an impression on your managers. That's always a plus.



If I didn't know any better, I'd say that was Tony holding little boy. And dear Jesus God! In addition to the weight, you are sporting a ponytail! Emo freak!



We'll end here at the end of the century because I'm sure the rest of the comment won't fit.
ehowton
ehowton at 2007-11-15 16:21 (UTC) (Link)

Part 1

Q. What is your obsession with CRTs? Even though they've been main stream for over 7 years, you still do not sport one in your home use. I do see, however, that you have/had a modded case not unlike Black Widow.
On the contrary, I've only ever owned CRT's. I 'sport' five currently throughout the house. They're cheap, and for a very long time, you could only get CRT's with Sun's 13W3 sync-on-green connection or HP's sync-on-red RGB. Up until a couple of years ago, they were still defacto the perfect screen for gaming and high-res digital work.

What made you get into computers in the first place?
Kind of like the first commercially available flying car, it was something to do. Brand new. I programmed in Apple Basic. A lot.

You started off with an Apple. Now you own a Mac mini. How ironic!
It would be more ironic if Apple weren't still one of only three or so major supplies of desktops all over the world. In other words, I had a 1-in-3 chance. The odds aren't all that surprising.

Do you just not like programming...
Bingo.

--like you've already had a lifetime of experience.
I've done a lot
God knows I've tried
To find the truth
I've even lied
But all I know
Is down inside I'm
Bleeding

Buying a monitor from Dillard's? That's not geekdom, that's...
Agreed! But the geek comment was reserved for running dual-monitors on an Apple IIe.

Have you always been a forward thinking person?
It comes in cycles. Sometimes I just get so tired all I want to do is rest and recharge.

Why did you write so many letters?
There were a lot of people I wanted to keep up with.

Did you ever aspire to be a writer?
Yes.

Is there a story that you want to tell about how you were/are torn between your passion for computers and your desire to be an accomplished writer?
No.

How did you get to party with lesbians?
We didn't know at the time. As the story unfolds, and over time, we guessed they just assumed photogoot and I were gay, therefore safe to hang out with. In all honesty, we were just trying to get laid. That never happened, and we didn't know why.

Suffice it to say I bet they got all naked and shit.
You've spent far, far too much time on the internet, my friend. Perhaps you should 'unplug' for a time and re-integrate yourself into the real world?

I'm guessing that there was a lot of history skipped; an epoch missed. I see that after the apple it appears that you went through a couple of PCs. When exactly did the Unix training occur?
We skipped 5-years due to obligations in the service. When I left the Air Force, I was a Navy Contractor, hired by a company who wanted someone with my background and clearance level that they could train to install software packages on Aircraft Carriers, and then train the U.S. Navy Sailors on the application's use. It was during this time they got fed up with me asking so many questions. "What does mt -t mean? What does mv do? Why is there a -R after a cp command?" Most of the cattle there were happy to follow the instructions in the book. I wanted to know what the commands in the book meant. It was my first introduction to unix. HP/UX 9.05. Later, they brought in a Unix Instructor and he gave us all a one-day class. I was fascinated.



Edited at 2007-11-15 04:22 pm (UTC)
Tomas Gallucci
schpydurx at 2007-11-15 16:58 (UTC) (Link)

Re: Part 1

CRTs
That was my bad. I meant to say that even though LCDs have been mainstream for seven years... Either way, you answer my question. I know that it has been said that CRTs were perfect for gaming, but I never found that to be the case. Maybe I've just always purchased good LCDs.

I had a 1-in-3 chance. The odds aren't all that surprising.
When you put it that way...

You don't like programming
So it's not that you can't do it. Hrm. I feel better about you modding Perl scripts now.

dual monitors
Thanks for the focus.

It comes in cycles. Sometimes I just get so tired all I want to do is rest and recharge.
That's all of us. Even me. My problem is I don’t have any discipline. If I did, I'd be behind the keyboard writing every night trying to make something of myself instead of consuming film. It's easier and more enjoyable to consume the product. But I get to try again tonight.

writing
I still say that you want to be a writer despite your obvious mad skillz and that there a story to tell but you just don't want to tell it. I mean hell, you're blogging so that your kids will know how you think. That, Sir, is a magnum opus in itself.

That never happened, and we didn't know why.
You had each other, semi-gay-shoes boy!

real world
I don't know what this means.

Later, they brought in a Unix Instructor and he gave us all a one-day class. I was fascinated.
Learn Unix in a day! Or is that supposed to be more like chess: a day to learn, a lifetime to master?
ehowton
ehowton at 2007-11-15 17:49 (UTC) (Link)

Re: Part 1

Maybe I've just always purchased good LCDs.
Until recently, there was no such thing. Perhaps your video card wasn't good enough, or your games were too old for you to tell the difference?
Tomas Gallucci
schpydurx at 2007-11-15 18:11 (UTC) (Link)

Re: Part 1

perhaps. Define recently.
Me
photogoot at 2007-11-16 01:41 (UTC) (Link)

Re: Part 1

I would like to correct one point in ehowton's story of the lesbian parties. We did know quite early on that there were at least a few lesbians. Over time we became amazed at just how many had gravitated to us. And just to set the record straight (no pun intended) I did have sex with one of those lesbians. It was hot.
Tomas Gallucci
schpydurx at 2007-11-16 01:45 (UTC) (Link)

Re: Part 1

How come you scored with the lesbians and Howton did not?
Me
photogoot at 2007-11-16 01:49 (UTC) (Link)

Re: Part 1

He was scoring with regular chicks I assure you. The lesbians over time became my rubik's cube. The more I played with them the more I wanted to figure them out. Eventually I cracked the code and solved the puzzle.
Tomas Gallucci
schpydurx at 2007-11-16 01:52 (UTC) (Link)

Re: Part 1

What is the asking price for your secret?
Me
photogoot at 2007-11-16 01:54 (UTC) (Link)

Re: Part 1

Some things can not be taught and can only be learned through experience. I recommend you get out more. Oh and in your case, become a better listener. You'd be surprised what you pick up when you shut up.
Tomas Gallucci
schpydurx at 2007-11-16 01:58 (UTC) (Link)

Re: Part 1

I recommend you get out more.
It's a big scary world out there. I like the indoors.

Oh and in your case, become a better listener. You'd be surprised what you pick up when you shut up.
the man that heareth speaketh constantly.
ehowton
ehowton at 2007-11-16 14:13 (UTC) (Link)

Re: Part 1

Well I wasn't going to "out" you (so to speak) but I suppose we can talk about it now. I was thrilled for you and jealous at the same time. You worked that mojo like a master!
ehowton
ehowton at 2007-11-15 16:21 (UTC) (Link)

Part 2

Where did all the weight come from?
I have found, over my many jobs and assignments, that I am a tactical person. Someone who operates, does. Someone who gets things done. Who adapts and thinks on their feet. Of course you never learn these things without failure. I discovered I am NOT a strategic-thinking person. I don't have a good grasp on "the big picture" nor do I operate well in a highly structured environment. On these things not only do I not excel, my talents are wasted and nothing moves forward. In the United States Air Force, I spent most of my years operating at, or under a Tactical Command. I was in my element. I shone, and was unstoppable. Unfortunately, the needs of the Air Force are greater than the needs of the individual. And of course just like any great institution, there is rarely flexibility for these types of arrangements; coupled with the fact that I didn't know these things about me yet. I was assigned to Strategic Command Headquarters. And I failed. Miserably. I was miserable, I was ineffective, and I didn't work for a year. That's likely where "all that weight" came from. Nonetheless, my failure was a learning experience. When I have job interviews now, I tell them where my strengths are and what I can and cannot do. I'm not guessing when I talk to these people - I'm explaining from experience.

Visually boring.
If you knew what you were looking at, you'd be very excited. I am! How about this: http://www.darkvoyager.com:8080/gallery/main.php?g2_itemId=1625

...you are sporting a ponytail! Emo freak!
Two things. First of all, back in the day, you weren't considered a Unix Admin unless you had a ponytail. Hiring Managers simply wouldn't hire you otherwise. Secondly, don't go throwing any terms which have evolved to mean something since you were born in 1983 to describe something you don't understand. I am none of these things, and furthermore, your description is inaccurate according to Wikiepedia:

Emo is also sometimes associated with a certain fashion. Emo clothing is characterized by tight jeans on males and females alike, long fringe (bangs) brushed to one side of the face or over one or both eyes, dyed black, straight hair, tight t-shirts which often bear the names of rock bands (or other designed shirts), studded belts, belt buckles, canvas sneakers or skate shoes or other black shoes (often old and beaten up) and thick, black horn-rimmed glasses. Emo fashion has changed with time. Early trends included straight, unparted hair (similar to that of Romulans and Vulcans in Star Trek), tightly fitting sweaters, button-down shirts, and work jackets.[citation needed] Dress currently may include trackjackets and hoodies. This fashion has at times been characterized as a fad.

In recent years, emo, in the popular media, has been associated with a stereotype that includes being emotional, sensitive, shy, introverted, or angsty. It is also associated with depression, self-injury, and suicide.
Tomas Gallucci
schpydurx at 2007-11-15 17:14 (UTC) (Link)

Re: Part 2

I am a tactical person.
I wasn't quite sure the difference between tactical and strategic (as to me they were the same thing) so I looked up the word tactical on dictionary.com According to said reference, tactical would imply coming up with a plan that gives you an advantage for the here and now, not thinking out progression or consequences at a later date and time. I'm therefore curious, how do you define the terms? I ask so that I can get a better idea of how you perceive yourself and how you operate.

I think that I prefer to bet tactical myself. It's not that I don't like to plan out, but I can only deal with so much before I become overwhelmed. Maybe that's why writing is such a drudgery for me.

Yannow, the more I learn about you, the more I learn about myself. I still say I'm your love child.

I wished I knew more about myself and how I work best so that I can become more efficient at what I do and use that information to actually accomplish my goals.

I'm having a thought here: you wrote a lot of code early on. I never wanted to be a Sys Admin. In fact, I hated thinking about being a Sys Admin, but the longer I'm in this industry, more and more I want to be a Sys Admin and less and less a programmer. It's not that I hate writing code it's that I hate the longevity and tediousness of projects. Is your experience/feelings similar?


If you knew what you were looking at, you'd be very excited.
Like I said, the machine itself is visually boring. I said nothing about it's actual capacity. I'm sure it was quite an awesome machine.

Hiring Managers simply wouldn't hire you otherwise.
HR people are the inexplicable freaks of this or any other planet.

your description is inaccurate
You've told me yourself time and again that you used to be emo and sport a ponytail too go with your 'tude.
ehowton
ehowton at 2007-11-15 17:45 (UTC) (Link)

Re: Part 2

I'm therefore curious, how do you define the terms?
I thought I did, in the paragraph which prompted you to ask this question.

...it's that I hate the longevity and tediousness of projects. Is your experience/feelings similar?
Some SysAdmins do day-to-day support of the same systems at the same place for years, and love doing so. Others come in, set up, and take off, ready to set up the next place, and never do day-to-day. Both have their grinds; both have their spikes. Don't limit what a SysAdmin does. Limit instead what you, as a SysAdmin want to do.

HR people are the inexplicable freaks of this or any other planet.
Yes! But only an idiot who wanted to be hired by a professional company would eschew them as such and not learn how to operate within their modus operandi.

You've told me yourself time and again that you used to be emo and sport a ponytail too go with your 'tude.
You're mixing up your stories. When I was young (oh so young) I used to have a twinge of teen angst but didn't know what it was. I wrote a lot, trying to express myself. It ended when my teenage years ended. I NEVER wore my ponytail out of anything remotely appearing to be attitude (unless in a professional setting, for example where the Unix dude is unfriendly and non-communicative.)
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