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Personal Workspaces - A History

Posted on 2007.11.14 at 09:12

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ehowton
ehowton at 2007-11-15 16:21 (UTC) (Link)

Part 2

Where did all the weight come from?
I have found, over my many jobs and assignments, that I am a tactical person. Someone who operates, does. Someone who gets things done. Who adapts and thinks on their feet. Of course you never learn these things without failure. I discovered I am NOT a strategic-thinking person. I don't have a good grasp on "the big picture" nor do I operate well in a highly structured environment. On these things not only do I not excel, my talents are wasted and nothing moves forward. In the United States Air Force, I spent most of my years operating at, or under a Tactical Command. I was in my element. I shone, and was unstoppable. Unfortunately, the needs of the Air Force are greater than the needs of the individual. And of course just like any great institution, there is rarely flexibility for these types of arrangements; coupled with the fact that I didn't know these things about me yet. I was assigned to Strategic Command Headquarters. And I failed. Miserably. I was miserable, I was ineffective, and I didn't work for a year. That's likely where "all that weight" came from. Nonetheless, my failure was a learning experience. When I have job interviews now, I tell them where my strengths are and what I can and cannot do. I'm not guessing when I talk to these people - I'm explaining from experience.

Visually boring.
If you knew what you were looking at, you'd be very excited. I am! How about this: http://www.darkvoyager.com:8080/gallery/main.php?g2_itemId=1625

...you are sporting a ponytail! Emo freak!
Two things. First of all, back in the day, you weren't considered a Unix Admin unless you had a ponytail. Hiring Managers simply wouldn't hire you otherwise. Secondly, don't go throwing any terms which have evolved to mean something since you were born in 1983 to describe something you don't understand. I am none of these things, and furthermore, your description is inaccurate according to Wikiepedia:

Emo is also sometimes associated with a certain fashion. Emo clothing is characterized by tight jeans on males and females alike, long fringe (bangs) brushed to one side of the face or over one or both eyes, dyed black, straight hair, tight t-shirts which often bear the names of rock bands (or other designed shirts), studded belts, belt buckles, canvas sneakers or skate shoes or other black shoes (often old and beaten up) and thick, black horn-rimmed glasses. Emo fashion has changed with time. Early trends included straight, unparted hair (similar to that of Romulans and Vulcans in Star Trek), tightly fitting sweaters, button-down shirts, and work jackets.[citation needed] Dress currently may include trackjackets and hoodies. This fashion has at times been characterized as a fad.

In recent years, emo, in the popular media, has been associated with a stereotype that includes being emotional, sensitive, shy, introverted, or angsty. It is also associated with depression, self-injury, and suicide.
Tomas Gallucci
schpydurx at 2007-11-15 17:14 (UTC) (Link)

Re: Part 2

I am a tactical person.
I wasn't quite sure the difference between tactical and strategic (as to me they were the same thing) so I looked up the word tactical on dictionary.com According to said reference, tactical would imply coming up with a plan that gives you an advantage for the here and now, not thinking out progression or consequences at a later date and time. I'm therefore curious, how do you define the terms? I ask so that I can get a better idea of how you perceive yourself and how you operate.

I think that I prefer to bet tactical myself. It's not that I don't like to plan out, but I can only deal with so much before I become overwhelmed. Maybe that's why writing is such a drudgery for me.

Yannow, the more I learn about you, the more I learn about myself. I still say I'm your love child.

I wished I knew more about myself and how I work best so that I can become more efficient at what I do and use that information to actually accomplish my goals.

I'm having a thought here: you wrote a lot of code early on. I never wanted to be a Sys Admin. In fact, I hated thinking about being a Sys Admin, but the longer I'm in this industry, more and more I want to be a Sys Admin and less and less a programmer. It's not that I hate writing code it's that I hate the longevity and tediousness of projects. Is your experience/feelings similar?


If you knew what you were looking at, you'd be very excited.
Like I said, the machine itself is visually boring. I said nothing about it's actual capacity. I'm sure it was quite an awesome machine.

Hiring Managers simply wouldn't hire you otherwise.
HR people are the inexplicable freaks of this or any other planet.

your description is inaccurate
You've told me yourself time and again that you used to be emo and sport a ponytail too go with your 'tude.
ehowton
ehowton at 2007-11-15 17:45 (UTC) (Link)

Re: Part 2

I'm therefore curious, how do you define the terms?
I thought I did, in the paragraph which prompted you to ask this question.

...it's that I hate the longevity and tediousness of projects. Is your experience/feelings similar?
Some SysAdmins do day-to-day support of the same systems at the same place for years, and love doing so. Others come in, set up, and take off, ready to set up the next place, and never do day-to-day. Both have their grinds; both have their spikes. Don't limit what a SysAdmin does. Limit instead what you, as a SysAdmin want to do.

HR people are the inexplicable freaks of this or any other planet.
Yes! But only an idiot who wanted to be hired by a professional company would eschew them as such and not learn how to operate within their modus operandi.

You've told me yourself time and again that you used to be emo and sport a ponytail too go with your 'tude.
You're mixing up your stories. When I was young (oh so young) I used to have a twinge of teen angst but didn't know what it was. I wrote a lot, trying to express myself. It ended when my teenage years ended. I NEVER wore my ponytail out of anything remotely appearing to be attitude (unless in a professional setting, for example where the Unix dude is unfriendly and non-communicative.)
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