?

Log in

No account? Create an account
Telephone

Nature of the Beast

Posted on 2011.06.30 at 16:20
Current Location: 75040
Tags:


This quarter’s report found an end to downtime, as 91% of mobile workers use their personal downtime to check their smartphones. Nearly 30% of mobile workers check their smartphone every six-to-12 minutes during downtime. The report, which drew from the experiences of more than 3,700 mobile employees at 1,100 enterprises worldwide, also found 61 percent of mobile workers sleep with their smartphone; 43% within arm’s reach. This intimate relationship with the smartphone has led to 38 percent of mobile workers waking up to check their smartphone during the night and 35 percent checking email first thing in the morning – even before getting dressed or eating breakfast.*


You know who they probably didn't survey? Short-order cooks. Waitresses. Construction workers. Those who blissfully dig ditches for a living. I bet those assholes still have downtime. As for me, this is what I signed up for. Before smartphones, it was a pager by my head which awoke me in the middle of the night. And as an IT Manager, it was just as bad for different reasons.

Before smartphones drax0r slept with a keyboard, mouse and LCD monitor on his bedside table. He could do all that above too without requiring a smartphone, and did. How does that figure into statistics? I'm also curious about this one:

29% of mobile workers find that their mobile technology usage causes friction in their personal relationships, specifically with their significant other or spouse.

Surely they mean mobile workers who's spouse is in a dissimilar field? I say that because I know couples in which both are IT or management and each understands the pressure to be connected and able to respond to emergencies at a moment's notice. There's no friction there - how could there be? What a steaming pile of alarmism.

So sure I check my blackberry before I even get out of bed. I'm available 24x7, its the nature of the beast. The quicker I respond, the more I know, willingness to participate, being easily accessible - these things not only help me stay employed, but those who annually assess me notice it too. And who says you can't charge back some of the time you spend on those emails anyway? There are days it seems I work 24-hours a day outside of being accessible. There are also times I enjoy a myriad of personal pursuits during those non-busy times I'm at work. Where's that latitude in your statistics?

Of course there are those who are always going to skew the numbers, but I'm not going to speak on those non-tech, Facebook addicted crackbabies - that's a beast of an entirely different color I have no desire to wrestle!






* iPass Mobile Workforce Report Q2 2011

Comments:


Michelle1963
michelle1963 at 2011-07-01 04:53 (UTC) (Link)
The article is skewed toward the opinion that being connected 24/7 is mutually exclusive with downtime. I disagree. While I don't have a smartphone, I do check my email frequently. But this does not interfere with downtime; it enhances it. For example, the fact that my manager can communicate with me via email or text, means that I read her messages when it is convenient for me, unlike if she were to call me.

Additionally, communicating with people I care about via email is what I do during my downtime.
Previous Entry  Next Entry