ehowton (ehowton) wrote,
ehowton
ehowton

Indoctrination


I don't tell my children what to believe, only how to think. I do press upon them my expectations of their behavior, but never without disclosing from where that expectation comes, before engaging them on their view of the pros and cons of alternative behavior in any given scenario. How would you choose to behave? Why? Do you think that would be appropriate, and if so, why? (My daughter hates this more than my son, but I'll give her a few more years).

When they ask me which socio-political/religious/pop-culture thing I believe, I stress the importance of basing those beliefs on the level of my own ignorance - were further evidence provided, I would absolutely adapt my viewpoint to include the new data no matter my feelings on the subject.

That said, I find it awkward talking to other adults who have no concept of independent thought, or who allow their mood to dictate their decision-making.

Imagine anyone believing one political party is "better" than another political party (and what must one think of those who support the opposition?) given subjective, individual nature and nurture. Imagine entire nations filled with grown adults convinced that of all the religions in all the world in all of history - their mom and dad miraculously taught them their regional God was the one true God and everyone else followed a false prophet. Or that any example of societal progression is the only natural course of action. Or all the reasons we justify behaving reprehensibly - treating someone badly out of selfishness because we feel we've been wronged. Surely there are those who rebel for the sake of rebellion - but without critical thinking behind those actionable items, no real wisdom is gained, for it replaces one broken ideology with another broken ideology.

When the things I experience; learn, differ from that which I was taught as truth - a reconciliation absolutely must take place...Childhood programming runs deep... And if we don't believe everything we were taught, how do we chose which things to believe and which not to believe? How can we question some things, but not others? Where is that line drawn?

I want my children to chose their own ideologies, and be able to defend their beliefs cheerfully, not with the conviction of principle, rather the knowledge they have the skills necessary to form their own opinions, rather than simply parroting that of their parents.
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